Narendra Modi has left India's economy a shattered mess
#91
Typically failure to see demand is weakening by creating more conflicts and over board protectionism they got even lesser demand.
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#92
Gross domestic pain on rise of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is scarcely the first country cousin in the developing world to overtake India in per capita income.

....
In 1960, as per the World Bank data, India’s per capita income was $82 and that of South Korea roughly twice at $158. By 1980, Korea’s per capita income was six times that of India — and at over $ 30,000 is 15 times in 2020. Thailand, which had a per capita income of $101 in 1960, now boasts of a per capita income of $7,300.

Consider Indonesia which has often been projected as the ‘I’ which could replace India in the BRICS group. In 1966, Indira Gandhi ascended to power in India and Suharto a year later in Indonesia. Both were strong, even authoritarian leaders. In 1970, Indonesia had a per capita income of roughly $80 and India was at $112. Half a century later, Indonesia boasts of a per capita income which is twice that of India at over $4,000. Take the case of war-ravaged Vietnam. Its per capita income in 1990 was less than a third of India at $95. In 2020, it boasts of a per capita income of $3,500.....

In 1991, China’s per capita income was at $333 and that of India was $303. Both countries were in the throes of opening up their economies. Nearly three decades later, in 2020, China’s per capita income is five times that of India.

https://www.newindianexpress.com/opinion...14705.html
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#93
26-10-2020 7:58 AM
Cityhantam said:
Gross domestic pain on rise of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is scarcely the first country cousin in the developing world to overtake India in per capita income.

....
In 1960, as per the World Bank data, India’s per capita income was $82 and that of South Korea roughly twice at $158. By 1980, Korea’s per capita income was six times that of India — and at over $ 30,000 is 15 times in 2020. Thailand, which had a per capita income of $101 in 1960, now boasts of a per capita income of $7,300.

Consider Indonesia which has often been projected as the ‘I’ which could replace India in the BRICS group. In 1966, Indira Gandhi ascended to power in India and Suharto a year later in Indonesia. Both were strong, even authoritarian leaders. In 1970, Indonesia had a per capita income of roughly $80 and India was at $112. Half a century later, Indonesia boasts of a per capita income which is twice that of India at over $4,000. Take the case of war-ravaged Vietnam. Its per capita income in 1990 was less than a third of India at $95. In 2020, it boasts of a per capita income of $3,500.....

In 1991, China’s per capita income was at $333 and that of India was $303. Both countries were in the throes of opening up their economies. Nearly three decades later, in 2020, China’s per capita income is five times that of India.

https://www.newindianexpress.com/opinion...14705.html

India media appears to be split on their treatment of Bangladesh overtaking them in GDP per capita.

Those who are against Modi basically go on a non-stop ranting against the government but are unable to provide any real alternate solutions. Others who are pro-Modi or simply jingoistic start performing mental gymnastics by citing as many alternate economic metrices they can think of to "prove" that all is well and India is just a few years from superpower status.

I'm not sure why the Singapore government is putting so much effort in trying to invest in India. Sure, if there are good opportunities in India feel free to go ahead, but not to the point like now where they seem to have "identified" India as the future growth driver and going all in despite serious financial setback and a litany of social issues.
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#94
26-10-2020 12:14 PM
maxsanic said:
India media appears to be split on their treatment of Bangladesh overtaking them in GDP per capita.

Those who are against Modi basically go on a non-stop ranting against the government but are unable to provide any real alternate solutions. Others who are pro-Modi or simply jingoistic start performing mental gymnastics by citing as many alternate economic metrices they can think of to "prove" that all is well and India is just a few years from superpower status.

I'm not sure why the Singapore government is putting so much effort in trying to invest in India. Sure, if there are good opportunities in India feel free to go ahead, but not to the point like now where they seem to have "identified" India as the future growth driver and going all in despite serious financial setback and a litany of social issues.

[Image: RIBelIr.jpg]

https://theindependent.sg/esm-goh-brags-...m-the-90s/

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#95
India farmers press on with protest despite offer to talk

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https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asi...s-13657260
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#96
Why I’m Losing Hope in India

My generation of Indians has often been disappointed in our country, and we have sometimes despaired about the direction it was taking, but it’s been impossible for us to stop hoping.

Our own past has trained us to see the silver lining.

Opportunities we couldn’t imagine growing up in the 1970s and ’80s emerged from nowhere and changed our lives, and many of us believe history will keep repeating, with the pain of the pandemic shocking the economy out of its pre-Covid inertia.

So it breaks my heart to have to suggest to today’s rising generation that this crisis is different than others we have weathered, that the walls are closing in again, and the opportunity set for India is shrinking, perhaps for a very long time. The national dream of emulating China’s rapid growth is receding — by some economic yardsticks, we can’t even keep up with Bangladesh.

A disturbing arbitrariness has crept into policymaking, institutions have decayed and the economy’s structural deficiencies have worsened. Animal spirits have been sucked out of all but a handful of firms. Zombie business groups are perched atop the debris of debt-fueled expansion, waiting for politicians to signal what role they still have, if any. The defeatist slogan of self-reliance, which blighted our parents’ generation, is back. Politicians are using religious discord and caste conflicts to drive a wedge in the society.

To make matters worse, India has handled the coronavirus pandemic with the same inept authoritarianism that’s come to define its approach in all spheres, economic, political and social. With more than 9 million infections, India is the second-worst affected country after the United States. The economy slipped into an unprecedented recession last quarter.

The post-lockdown economy will simply not have enough demand to consume what can be produced. There’s some attempt to reform the supply side — labor and farm markets, in particular. But not much is being done to revive demand, either in the short or the long run. Some of us are wondering if this callousness will cause India’s demographic dividend — two out of three Indians are still in the magic age group of 15 to 64 years — to go unclaimed.

Yes, there’s time. If India stops turning inward and embraces an open, transparent partnership with global investors, hundreds of millions more would get a shot at prosperity. A stagnant world economy could tap a new source of future demand. The West might win a strong and reliable security partner in Asia. The ’90s optimism will renew itself. But if India remains stuck in a middle-income trap, people will soon stop asking if it could be the next China. My generation already has.

.........

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2020-...na-battle/
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#97
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..... Call it buyers’ remorse. Those of us who thought that muscular leadership would revive India’s dream of mimicking Chinese-style double-digit expansion are not just disappointed. For many of my generation, our long-cherished hope for a better, greater India is all but gone. We wanted to trade some of our democratic chaos for a little bit more growth. We ended up with less of both.
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#98








Some say time to buy India bank?
Got to be serious.
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#99




Buy india airlines?

I never see any european countries, us , Japan, China, Thai king, Burnei ruler interested.
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The bullet train project will need up to 30 such machines, Achal Khare, Managing Director of the National High Speed Rail Corporation (NHSRL), said.

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https://indianexpress.com/article/india/...e-7073445/
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