This is how Trump will win another term!
#1




Looking very high chances of 4 more years!
Well done Trump! U the man!
“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice."
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#2
Trump and the GOP is going all in this november! Show hand! All or nothin!

USA will become a one party state, one way or the other, just like Chyna!
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#3
Beware the 'Secret Trump Voters'; they're out there despite the ...www.washingtontimes.com › news › aug › beware-the-...
Aug 11, 2020 - A recent survey found that there may be “secret Trump supporters” in at least one swing state who could tilt the election toward the president on ...

As long not above 5 percent gap in the polls, still a chance.
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#4
1-9-2020 9:25 PM
Sinostar said:




Looking very high chances of 4 more years!
Well done Trump! U the man!
This guy is from South Africa.. Dad is Swiss(White) and Mom is Native South African.... He come to America just not too long ago.

He should not interface with their local politics. Imagine when a new CECA becomes PR and start a radio show promoting our main ruling party, how will you(Singaporean Army Certificed) feel? waiting
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#5
Anything can change at this stage of final moment
They are divisive country ...or I would say a lot voters can swing either way ..
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#6
2-9-2020 5:15 AM
jameslee58 said:
Anything can change at this stage of final moment
They are divisive country ...or I would say a lot voters can swing either way ..

Trump is more prominent in the media talking about bring jobs to American
which I think is his attraction to many over Biden, but the number of jobless
now is perhaps too overwhelming for Trump.
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#7
Trump will win,,we cannot have a sleeping President,, wonder why Democrat send this guy..
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#8
Trump could win again without cheating

https://theconversation.com/trump-could-...ing-144539

If cheat, 100% will win.

4 more years
“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice."
Quote
#9
Liberal pundits often say that Donald Trump is on the wrong side of history. From this perspective, he’s a relic and a reactionary, a living reminder of all the skeletons in America’s closet.

A Democratic victory in November thus feels inevitable, especially given Trump’s objectively awful handling of the pandemic.

But history only moves the way it is pushed. And from a longue durée view, it’s Trump who has the power to do the pushing, thanks not only to his deep pockets and ruthlessness but also to the deep support of two long-privileged groups in American life.

A white nation

In 1841, Congressmen briefly argued about whether Irish and German immigrants should be able to claim western lands at the low and regulated prices paid by U.S. citizens. They voted yes, 30-12. As an afterthought, they banned Black Americans from this policy by the count of 37-1.

Nothing better captures the racial terms and conditions of American nationhood as it took form in the early 1800s. For white people, America was a land of republican liberty and equality, a giant breath of fresh air from the suffocating hierarchies of Europe.

It was also a violently racist society that saw Black people as chattels or nuisances and left no room for Indigenous nations.

As the historian Edmund S. Morgan famously explained, white republicanism and racism grew together. White Americans could be fair and friendly with each other precisely because they were all members of a privileged group.

Georgia’s governor put it this way as his state seceded from the Union in 1861: Under slavery, even the poorest farmer “belongs to the only true aristocracy, the race of white men.”

The Civil War destroyed slavery but preserved white supremacy. The United States remained a haven for many millions of Europeans, while Black people did not even gain de jure citizenship until the 1960s.

An employers’ republic

Racism aside, the most striking thing about the 1841 vote on western lands was its assumption that all white men deserved to own property. Most Americans embraced this ideal because it spread power widely through society, enabling every white man to be his own boss.

The dream was real enough until the late 1800s, when family farming collapsed and huge new corporations took over much of the economy. The percentage of men who were self-employed plummeted through the early 1900s, stoking bitter class struggles that only calmed with the post-Second World War boom.

For much of the Cold War, prosperity kept employees happy even as real power rested with their employers — the people who decided whom to hire and fire.

In Canada and most European countries in this period, left-leaning parties won major public interventions in health care and labour relations, curbing the power of employers and giving most people social and economic rights that come from their citizenship, not their work.

That never happened in the United States.

Most Americans thus need their employers not only for wages or salaries, but also for health insurance. America’s weak safety net makes workers even more fearful of losing their jobs.

Even though they make up a tiny fraction of the population, bosses thus wield enormous clout over everyday life. In America more than in other western countries, their particular interests tend to stand in for “common sense.”

Making America comfortable again

What does this have to do with Trump’s re-election chances?

First, we need to recall that many white Americans have felt on the defensive since the Civil Rights revolution of the 1960s. They don’t see themselves as racist, yet they’re also uncomfortable sharing power and visibility with people of colour.

A photo from 1968 showing striking sanitation workers marching past Tennessee National Guard troops with bayonets in Memphis, Tenn.
While many white people supported the civil rights movement in the 1960s, they remain uncomfortable with the idea of sharing power with Black people and other non-white citizens. (AP Photo/Charlie Kelly)
In effect, Trump invites such voters to be comfortable again with their white privileges. This certainly worked in 2016. “From the beer track to the wine track, from soccer moms to NASCAR dads,” Ta-Nehesi Coates wrote in The Atlantic in 2017, “Trump’s performance among whites was dominant.” Among white women, he bested Hilary Clinton by nine points; among white men, he prevailed by 31 points.

As for the nation’s employers, the last 50 years have been kind: all Republicans and many Democrats have rolled back the limited gains that labour made during the New Deal.

For corporate titans as well as small business owners, Trump is more good news. As early as 2000, Trump announced his desire to privatize (that is, to end) Social Security. In office, he’s slashed taxes on businesses and the wealthy along with health, safety and environmental regulations.

Trump even throws a few bones to manufacturing companies by raising tariffs on friends and foes alike.

For all his volatility and incompetence, then, Trump is the default choice — even the safe choice — for a critical mass of white voters and business owners. The deaths of nearly 170,000 Americans to COVID-19 won’t change that, in part because the victims are disproportionately Black, Indigenous, people of colour and poorer workers.

With all this history on his side, Trump will be hard to beat even if he fights fair, which he almost certainly will not do.

The Democrats are in for a desperate fight.

Racism
Slavery
White privilege
Donald Trump
US Civil war
White voters
anti-Black racism
2020 US elections
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“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice."
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#10
To summarise
1. America is racist, mainly white supremacy
2. America is an oligarchy, where the rich businessmen are behind the congress and senate.
3. The pandemic kills mainly non white.
4. Trump is pro 1 & pro 2. 1 & 2 will support him!

So he bojiak another 4 more years!
Make America Comfortable Again! MACA!
“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice."
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